ANCIENT GOLD COINS FOR SALE. COINS FOR SALE


ANCIENT GOLD COINS FOR SALE. GOLD ROUND STUD EARRINGS. STERLING AND GOLD BRACELET.



Ancient Gold Coins For Sale





ancient gold coins for sale






    gold coins
  • A gold coin is a coin made mostly or entirely of gold. Gold has been used for coins practically since the invention of coinage, originally because of gold's intrinsic value.

  • Gold dollar | Quarter Eagle ($2.50) | Three-dollar piece | Half Eagle ($5) | Eagle ($10) | Double Eagle ($20)

  • Coin minted in gold, such as the American Eagle or the Canadian Maple Leaf.





    for sale
  • purchasable: available for purchase; "purchasable goods"; "many houses in the area are for sale"

  • For Sale is the fifth album by German pop band Fool's Garden, released in 2000.

  • For Sale is a tour EP by Say Anything. It contains 3 songs from …Is a Real Boy and 2 additional b-sides that were left off the album.





    ancient
  • Having been in existence for a very long time

  • Showing or feeling signs of age or wear

  • belonging to times long past especially of the historical period before the fall of the Western Roman Empire; "ancient history"; "ancient civilizations such as those of the Etruscans and Sumerians"; "ancient Greece"

  • a person who lived in ancient times

  • Belonging to the very distant past and no longer in existence

  • a very old person











ancient gold coins for sale - Ancient Enemies




Ancient Enemies (Volume 2)


Ancient Enemies (Volume 2)



The story of "The Ancient" continues... Joseph Miller and Mike Samson are closing in on one of the Fallen on the busy streets of New York City, with the help of a young woman who just happens to grow fur and fangs. Little do they know someone from Miller's past is hunting them to settle a grudge over a thousand years old. Meanwhile, Lizzie Namgung is desperately searching for her missing friend Ann. Much to her surprise, so is the FBI. As a new evil spreads across the city of Newark, Lizzie finds herself caught in a web of murder, mayhem, and monsters. Ancient Awakening is a Horror/Action novel with just the right touch of comedy. Ancient Enemies is the second book in the series that follows the adventures of eccentric demon hunter Joseph Miller. His job is to defend the human race against seven mythical demons and their offspring. Unfortunately for us, he has been dead for the last hundred years. The series begins with Ancient Awakening, continues here with Ancient Enemies, and is followed by Ancient Revelations. The all-new second edition of Ancient Enemies is professionally edited and 55,700 words.










80% (10)





An Excessively Rare and Highly Important Roman Republican Gold Stater of Titus Quinctius Flamininus, the First Numismatic Portrait of a Living Roman Citizen, a Coin of the Highest Interest and Prestig




An Excessively Rare and Highly Important Roman Republican Gold Stater of Titus Quinctius Flamininus, the First Numismatic Portrait of a Living Roman Citizen, a Coin of the Highest Interest and Prestig





The Roman Republic

Titus Quinctius Flamininus, Consul in 198 BC

d=19 mm
Stater, Chalkis (?) Circa 196, AV 8.41 g. Bare head of Titus Quinctius Flamininus r. Rev. [T] QVINCTI Nike, standing l., holding palm in l. hand and wreath in r., crowing the name of the Consul. Babelon Quinctia 2. Bahrfeldt 9. Biaggi 9. Kraay-Himer 579 var. (legend downward). Kent-Hirmer 29 var. (legend downwards). C. Botre, RIN XCVI, p. 49 (this coin cited). C. Botre, SNR 76 pp. 65-73. Calico 29. Wealth of the Ancient World 109 (these dies). Crawford 548/1b.

Of the highest rarity, only ten specimens known of which four are in museums. An issue of

great historical importance, bearing the first portrait of a living Roman. An unusually

good portrait of the Consul in fine Hellenistic style. Light scratches on cheek,

a graffito and weakly struck on reverse, otherwise about extremely fine
Ex Leu 20, 1978, 79 and Triton IV, 1999, 179 sales.

Portraiture has long been recognized as the hallmark of Roman coinage, and since the gold staters of T. Quinctius Flamininus are the forbearers of that tradition, they are understandably among the great prizes of ancient coinage. The coin portrait was a Persian invention of the late 5th Century B.C. that was embraced by the Greeks about a century later, and was reluctantly adopted by the Romans in the 40s B.C. Once that Roman taboo was shattered by Julius Caesar and his successors, coin portraits became a tradition in which no Roman could find fault or shame. But the gold staters of Flamininus predate this by more than 150 years, and it is that quality, in concert with their beauty, historical context and rarity that make them the object of such admiration. Only a remarkable circumstance could account for such an issue, and we find it in 196 B.C., in the aftermath of the Roman defeat of the Macedonian army of King Philip V. It was a moment of great triumph, Rome’s international prestige reached a new height. The Romans had first encountered a professional Greek army in Southern Italy when they fought Pyrrhus, the king of Epirus, late in the 3rd Century B.C. Later still, the Romans defeated the Illyrians in 228 and 219, securing their first foothold in the Balkan peninsula. In doing so, however, they aroused the suspicions of the Macedonian King Philip V, who opened a second front against Rome in the midst of its terrifying war with Hannibal. Rome forged alliances with the Aetolians and other Greeks to keep Philip V at bay while they remained focused on Hannibal. Only in 205, after Rome had turned the tide against Carthage, were they in a position to negotiate peace with the Macedonians. The Romans had not forgotten the liberties Philip took during their time of weakness, and in 200 they intervened in his affairs at the request of their own allies in Greece and Asia. The consul Galba and his successor made little headway over the course of two years, but when Flamininus became a consul in 198 he fought with great vigour in Greece and Macedon. Upon learning that his consular powers would be renewed for the following year, Flamininus sabotaged the Macedonian diplomatic efforts so he could exact a more favorable settlement through his anticipated military success. His gamble paid off, and Flamininus roundly defeated the Macedonian at Cynoscephalae in 197. If possible, the terms for peace were more devastating than the battle: though Philip remained king of Macedon, he had to free every Greek city from his yoke, to pay an indemnity of 1,000 talents, and to forfeit all but six vessels from his navy. Thus we find the context for this gold stater: when Flamininus, on behalf of himself and the senate of Rome, proclaimed the freedom of all the cities of Greece. It is likely these coins were struck as a donative to the victorious army, though we probably will never know if the coins were produced by Flamininus or by the thankful Greeks. At least a portion of the mintage was paid to Roman legionnaires, since several of the known specimens have been found in Italy, and presumably were brought home by veterans of the Second Macedonian War (who returned to Italy almost immediately). In all but its Latin inscription, this coin is Greek. Its denomination is the attic-weight stater, its style and fabric are consistent with Greek coins of the period, its use of a portrait on the obverse (even if not diademed in a regal fashion) derives from the legacy of Greek royal portraiture and, finally, its reverse design is based upon the gold staters of the type introduced by Alexander the Great. They probably were distributed at the Isthmian Games in the summer of 196, the deadline by which Philip was to have withdrawn his garrisons from all Greek cities; it was an ideal occasion for Flamininus to proclaim his universal freedom, for Greeks had gathered there from throughout the Mediterranean world.

NAC39, 85











An Exceedingly Rare and Highly Important Roman Imperatorial Gold Aureus of M. Junius Brutus with L. Plaetorius Caestianus, One of Two Known Gold Aureii of the Famous EID MAR Type




An Exceedingly Rare and Highly Important Roman Imperatorial Gold Aureus of M. Junius Brutus with L. Plaetorius Caestianus, One of Two Known Gold Aureii of the Famous EID MAR Type





The Roman Republic

M. Junius Brutus with L. Plaetorius Caestianus. Aureus, mint moving with Brutus in Northern Greece 43-42, AV 7.84 g. BRVT IMP – L·PLAET·CEST Bare head of M. Junius Brutus r. Rev. Pileus between two daggers; below, EID·MAR. Sydenham –. B. –. Sear Imperators 215. H. Cahn, Actes du Congres Internationale de Numismatique, Paris 1953, p. 213 (this coin) = H. Cahn, Q. Tic 18, 1989, 24a (this coin). Calico 58 (this coin). Crawford –. Biaggi 39 (this coin)
Of the highest rarity, only two specimens known. A coin of tremendous fascination
and historical importance, which has been debated for decades among scholars.
Scratch on reverse field and pierced at twelve o’ clock, otherwise very fine

Ex NAC sale 27, 2004, 282. From the Biaggi collection.
Perhaps no coin of antiquity is as familiar, or as important, as the ‘eid mar’ issue of Brutus: its dagger-flanked liberty cap and explicit inscription are a simple and direct monument of one of the great moments in western history. So remarkable is the type that it elicited commentary from an ancient historian Dio Cassius (XLVII.25). The murder of the dictator Julius Caesar in the Senate House on the Ides of March, 44 B.C., is one of the major turning points in western history. It is impossible to know how history would have changed had Caesar not been murdered on that day, but the prospect certainly taxes one's imagination.
The designs are worth visiting in detail. The reverse testifies to the murder of Caesar by naming the date, by showing daggers as the instruments of delivery, and by showcasing the pileus, or freedman’s cap, as the fruit of the assassins’ undertaking. Though dozens of men were involved in the plot against Caesar, all are represented by only two daggers – a clear allusion to Brutus and Cassius as leaders of the coup and, subsequently, of the armed opposition to Antony and Octavian. Caesar was a populist, and an opportunist, bent upon dismantling the traditional arrangement of senatorial authority, which was based on the concentration of power within the hands of the ancient and elite families. In the minds of Brutus and his fellow conspirators, it was a struggle to maintain their traditional hold on power, and with that aim they struck down Caesar. This class struggle was couched in the terms of the ancient form of Republican government, and of Rome’s hatred for kings and autocrats; thus it comes as no surprise that the two daggers – indeed the two leaders Brutus and Cassius – follow the twin-symmetry of the two consuls, and even of Castor and Pollux, the mythical saviours of Rome.
The portrait is also of great interest and importance. The only securely identifiable portraits of Brutus occur on coins naming him imperator: the ‘eid mar’ denarii of Plaetorius Cestianus and the aurei of Servilius Casca and Pedanius Costa. Indeed, all other portraits on coins or other media are identified based upon these three issues, inscribed BRVTVS IMP on the aurei, and BRVT IMP on the denarii. Careful study has been made of the ‘eid mar’ series from the numismatic perspective by H. A. Cahn, and from the art-historical view by S. Nodelman. The latter has convincingly divided Brutus’ inscribed coin portraits into three main categories: a ‘baroque’ style portrait on the aurei of his co-conspirator Casca, a ‘neoclassical’ style on the aurei of his legatus Costa, and a ‘realistic’ style on the ‘eid mar’ of Cestianus. Nodelman describes the ‘eid mar’ portraits as ”the soberest and most precise” of all. Furthermore, he divides the ‘eid mar’ portraits into two distinct categories – ‘plastic’ and ‘linear’ – and suggests both were derived from the same sculptural prototype. The portrait on this particular coin belongs to Nodelman’s ‘plastic’ group, as it perfectly exemplifies the ”stability and simplicity of shape” that characterize this category.

NAC45, 42









ancient gold coins for sale








ancient gold coins for sale




Ancient Awakening






Hell comes home to Jersey. Seven ancient demons known as the Fallen have awakened in New Jersey after a hundred years. Fortunately for Mike and Ann, so has the one man who can stop them, Joseph Miller. Trapped in a hospital filled with mythical monsters, only together can they unravel the mystery of the Cursed and escape with not only their lives but their very humanity.

Ancient Awakening is a Horror/Action novel with just the right touch of comedy. It is the first book in the series The Ancient which follows the adventures of eccentric demon hunter Joseph Miller. His job is to defend the human race against seven mythical demons and their offspring. Unfortunately for us, he has been dead for the last hundred years. Ancient Awakening will be followed by Ancient Enemies and Ancient Revelations.

The second edition of Ancient Awakening is re-edited, re-cut, and re-"vamped" for maximum monster hunter action.










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